Dementia: How do you help?

I first talked about my aunt having dementia in this post, “Grief.” Although I have seen personally how dementia affects the person in different ways and how family are affected too, does not mean I know everything. But I am learning and I still want to learn anything new that can help that person with dementia.

Is it still difficult to get information?

I have been searching the last few weeks of ways I can interact with my aunt who is in a nursing home. Although there is information out there about dementia, I think it can still be difficult getting the information or ideas. What do you think?
I have a couple of apps that may be good for my aunt, depending on what she is like that day. But not many apps as I thought there would be and some apps I have seen supposedly for dementia patients, I did not know how to work it!

Interacting with my aunt

I have found in interacting with my aunt, that discussing her work can be a topic at times. From observing how she handles her duvet cover and how she moves her hands, it gives me the impression she is checking and mending items. (Something she did in a factory when she was younger.)

Even if I don’t get a word back from my aunt, I will carry on making small talk of some sort, like the weather outside, while smiling and giving a gentle touch now and again for reassurance.

Last week, I bought my aunt a garden magazine, which she kept looking at through the day. I plan to buy another one a few weeks later, but a lighter magazine, as she said this one was a bit heavy.

Helping my mum

This weekend, I plan to get my mum involved with something for my aunt. (My mum’s sister.) What I plan to do, will help my mum to interact with her sister. This will involve copying old photos and laminating them, with some writing on the back of who, or where it is for example.

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3 thoughts on “Dementia: How do you help?

  1. I worked with dementia for a while and the thing I found worked the best was using the happiest times in their life to trigger memories. Examples could be finding clothes they would of worn, music they listened to or food they ate. This worked the majority of the time and the people got back some of their memories, if only for a short while. It’s a very nice feeling seeing a dementia sufferer having a reason to smile.

    Liked by 1 person

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