Book review: “How to cook food for food allergies,” by Lucinda Bruce-Gardyne.

As you know from Chit-chat July, I discovered this book in my library, with choosing to further go dairy-free in my diet. The book in the photograph, is the one I had from the library, until I bought my own second-hand copy, from eBay.

Book cover of How to cook food for food allergies
Book cover of “How to cook food for food allergies,” by Lucinda Bruce-Gardyne.

Although I bought it for dairy-free advice, this book also covers for those who can’t eat eggs, soya, nuts and gluten.

I love how the book is presented, to help you cut out what you need to cut out in your food. In this case, dairy for me. It gives you alternatives to use instead.

There is very helpful advice, like how to avoid cross-contamination of foods that would cause a reaction in those that can’t have particular foods.
It also gives advice on how you can make cooking for a family easier for yourself.
It advises on other things like making sure nursery, or schools are happy and confident in catering for your child with a food allergy, and how you can make sure their parties remain safe, while still being fun and not making them feel excluded, or feel different.

As well as advice on cooking at home, there is advice when it comes to eating out.

For each food ingredient that would need to be left out, there is an alternative suggestion you can use in its place.

There is a handy table that shows what nutrients you may be missing out of, when cutting out either dairy, egg, wholegrain wheat, white wheat flour, soya, or nuts, with information on what those nutrients do and where else you could get those from.

In the last part of the book, there are recipes, which the author has kept as simple as possible.
Many recipes are suitable for all allergies mentioned, without adapting. But where a recipe will need adapting, it’s clearly marked with a flagging system for that allergy and an alternative is given.

 

© Elizabeth Fisher and My Wellbeing and Learning Journey.

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Book review: The self-care revolution, by Suzy Reading.

Through doing different Google searches related to self-care, after realising slowly I have been slipping up at times and so open to fresh ideas, I came across this book, “The self-care revolution,” by Suzy Reading.
I did further searches on this book, then looked at the reviews for the book and liked what I seen.
I even seen an article about the “vitality wheel,” through researching this book. The article was an interview with Suzy Reading for this book and she explained how the “vitality wheel” works. I knew even more this book felt like it was going to be useful for me, along with making my own “vitality wheel,” with it being a visual thing. (I will share my “vitality wheel” and anything else I take from this book, in a later post.)
I bought this book from The Works, as it was a few pounds cheaper there.

Book cover of the self-care revolution by Suzy Reading

This book is designed to help and restore your day-to-day energy reserves. Remember me mentioning the “vitality wheel” before?
In this book you will learn about creating your own “vitality wheel.” It’s a complete body and mind self-care toolkit.
The “vitality wheel” consists of eight parts, which the book separates into these eight parts individually as a chapter.

  • Sleep, rest relaxation and breathing
  • Movement and nutrition
  • Coping skills
  • Physical environment
  • Social connection
  • Mood boosters
  • Goal-setting and accomplishment
  • Values and purpose

The book can be started anywhere you like, so just pick the section you feel you need to focus on first and go from there. But I think when you first pick up this book, to read it through the first time, then go back to where you feel after.

As well as creating your own “vitality wheel,” it also suggests creating a journal. But you don’t have to, as the author of this book wants you to pick out what is right for you.

Over time, you may need to update your “vitality wheel,” because our needs change. So this book will always become a referencing tool to refer back to and remind you.

I have felt this book has replaced past books I found handy, because I find this visually more appealing and easy to read. I have learnt a lot more new things, from this book too.

The author tells a bit about herself at the beginning and how she came about creating this book. It then goes into the introduction of self-care, followed by the “vitality wheel.” After that, each chapter is for each part of the “vitality wheel.”
After the chapters associated with each part of the wheel, it goes on about your self-care toolkit, reminding you how it’s not selfish to practice self-care. Then a reminder of what to do next, in the following chapter, giving examples of what you could have as your self-care toolkit.

There are mantras and affirmations you can try, as well as a few yoga poses for each part of the “vitality wheel.” Again, the author reminds you to choose what you feel is right for you.

This book is certainly something I recommend and it’s a book to refer back to as your needs change in the future.

If you liked this post, then look out for a further post on Saturday when I share my vitality wheel that I have created for myself. I will also be sharing my wellness journal in that post too.

 

© Elizabeth Fisher and My Wellbeing and Learning Journey.

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Gratitude

As you will have probably noticed, I have not been sharing my gratitude posts each month. In 2019 and maybe beyond, I have no plans to. But that doesn’t mean I still won’t be doing them.

For Christmas, I received, “The Gratitude Journal for Women.” Illustrations are by Katie Vernon and the text by Katherine Furman. So my gratitude practice will be inside this journal.

Cover of book The Gratitude Journal for Women

The journal is beautifully illustrated and I feel there are plenty of pages inside. The illustrations are relaxing and, calming and the journal provides thought-provoking quotes and prompts, which can be completed in 5 minutes a day. Although 5 minutes is suggested by the book that they can be completed in, you could spend a little longer if you wanted  and I feel there is room on the pages to do so.

There are lots of prompts in this book, that will certainly allow for self-explanatory and reflection.

 

© Elizabeth Fisher and My Wellbeing and Learning Journey.

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Book review: “The Spirits of Myndd Eira,” by Rosie Rees

This is the authors first written book. “The Spirits of Myndd Eira,” by Rosie Rees and after how much I enjoyed reading this book, I felt I had to share my review here.

The character in the book, Rosie, runs away after another betrayal. She finds herself in a sleepy village of Myndd Eira. There she discovers some secrets and mysteries that she soon becomes part of, accepting reality isn’t what it seems. Tragedy strikes and it’s a battle between light and darkness.

I started chuckling in first couple of paragraphs of reading this book and in parts further in.

As well as laughter, there were also years and some on the edge of the seat stuff.
I love how the story is told and the way it is written. I was hooked all the way through, which meant I finished reading the book within 3 days. I could not put it down.
I could imagine the place, the characters and feel their feelings.
I can’t wait to read more books from this author.

You will find her book available on Amazon.

Link to Rosie Rees Facebook page.

 

© Elizabeth Fisher and My Wellbeing and Learning Journey.

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Favourite Christmas books

I don’t have any memories reading Christmas books and as an adult, it’s only this year I have thought about reading one maybe.

Inspire me. Have you read any Christmas books?

 

© Elizabeth Fisher and My Wellbeing and Learning Journey.

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E-readers or books?

Last time I had this conversation was years ago when I used to write my deaf blog. Then, I loved to hold books (and still do) even though I owned a  Kindle. When I owned a Kindle, it was when they started to get smaller and before the paper white version came out. I had my Kindle for some years until I sold it, being faithful to paper books instead. But also paper books were  out-waying the Kindle and I wasn’t using the Kindle much, as well as not wanting to be committed to Amazon. (Although the last part, I may have understood wrong about that years ago, or things have changed since. So you may be able to help me with that question. Keep reading.) So with the Kindle being pushed to one side, I decided it was time to sell.

Fast forward to present. As I say, I still prefer paper books, but I either buy mostly second-hand, or use the library. The last book I bought new, was “The Highly Sensitive Person,” by Elaine N. Aron, Ph. D, then before that, “Lagom.”

Being in a smaller place, means I have no intention of buying a new book I intend to keep, unless another book is removed to put in its place. But with the books I am currently happy with, means I have no need to buy.
I will still buy second-hand now and again, but this is because once I have read it, it will be put back into a bag for charity.
I also have the library where I can read a book from too.

I have been thinking whether it’s worth me buying an e-reader again. But do I buy a Kindle that I have experienced before, but a newer model? If so, does buying a Kindle mean I have to commit myself to Amazon, or can I get a book for it from anywhere? as I don’t want to join Amazon.

If I don’t buy a Kindle, what other e-reader is good?

I have thought about e-readers again, because I know you can get free books too for them, as I used to mostly read free books before, when I had the Kindle. But whether in the end I will buy one, I don’t know. I want to make sure it would be something I’d carry on using and not put away again after so many years.

Can you help/advise?

Maybe my readers read from e-readers. What e-reader do you use? Maybe you can also answer my above question regarding the Kindle?

Maybe you are just a paper book fan and avoid. Maybe you like both.

Do share your thoughts and I hope you are able to advise too.

Thank you in advance.

 

© Elizabeth Fisher and My Wellbeing and Learning Journey.

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Book review: “The Art of Happiness – A handbook for the living,” by HH Dalai Lama and Howard C. Cutler.

This book is not something I would usually read, but because of the way my path is changing for the better, along with other things that have helped me to get where I am today, I chose to read this book.

This book, my mum is now reading, after waiting patiently. She was very curious as to why I was reading it, as well as interested herself. My mum does not really know everything I have been doing, to get where I am today. When there has been parts I have revealed to her, because I thought they would be helpful to her, she did not take them on board. Maybe she will, when she has read this book herself, although my mum has other qualities already, like easily showing empathy for other people.

This book should be read by everyone, as there is something we would all learn by reading it.
This book is not preaching religion and it doesn’t matter if you are religious, or not, or whatever religion you are, we all have something to learn from this book, to better ourselves.
I have enjoyed reading every page of this book and although I’m doing some things already, I still have lots to take on board.
Once mum has read this book, I shall pick up this again, reading it all through once more and maybe taking some notes along the way. Then later, it will be useful to read in parts where needed.
This book will remain on my bookshelf and prove to be useful, in the future.

Now don’t be put off with the contents of this very informative book, as it is easy to read in small doses and pick back up on where you left off. But that’s if you can put it down.

Contents of this book:

Authors notes
Introduction

1. The Purpose of Life
Chapter 1: The Right to Happiness
Chapter 2: The Source of Happiness
Chapter 3: Training the Mind for Happiness

2. Human Warmth and Compassion
Chapter 5: A New Model for Intimacy
Chapter 6: Deepening Our Connection to Others
Chapter 7: The Value of Benefits of Compassion

3. Transforming Suffering
Chapter 8: Facing Suffering
Chapter 9: Self-Created Suffering
Chapter 10: Shifting Perspective
Chapter 11: Finding Meaning in Pain and Suffering

4. Overcoming Obstacles
Chapter 12: Bringing about Change
Chapter 13: Dealing with Anger and Hatred
Chapter 14: Dealing with Anxiety and Building Self-Esteem

5.Closing Reflections on Living a Spiritual Life
Chapter 15: Basic Spiritual Values

Acknowledgments
Bibliography

 

© Elizabeth Fisher and My Wellbeing and Learning Journey.

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Book review: “Wonder,” by R. J. Palacio.

“Wonder,” by R. J. Palacio, is a well written and engaging book that I planned on reading, before watching the film of the same name. August is the main character of this book, who has a facial abnormality. He has been home-schooled most of his life, but is going to go to school for the first time and he is dreading it. In the book, you follow his journey. All he wants is to be like other kids and be accepted for who he is and not what he looks like.
I won’t go into too much detail of the book, as I don’t want to spoil it for those who have not read it yet.

Does he get accepted? You will have to read the book, to find out.

I like how the book is written from August’s perspective. The other characters in the book, you get to read from their perspective too.

It is written in short chapters, so you can easily put it down and come back to it later. But if you are like me, you will find it hard to put down. I read this book within the week!

The book is a powerful read and emotional. (It made me tearful, towards the end.) I recommend you read this book whether you have seen the film, or not.

It is also a book that I think everyone should read.

 

© Elizabeth Fisher and My Wellbeing and Learning Journey.

Unauthorised use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to My Wellbeing and Learning Journey with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. But Guest Posts that feature on my blog are not allowed at all to be duplicated.

Book review: “Untangled: A story of resilience, courage and triumph,” by Alexis Rose.

“Untangled: …” by Alexis Rose is her own true life story, recalling her life of unimaginable abuse and explicit threats. Alexis Rose repressed these memories of her past, until a family tragedy forced her to face what her life had been.

This book gives a note to the readers before the story starts, to warn how it could be triggering because of descriptions of sexual and physical abuse.

A history of abuse, torture and threats to maintain her silence or be killed, could no longer be denied.
This book is her story of facing the truth and risking the consequences of breaking the silence, to start a healing journey and to learn to live her life. Alexis Rose had to also learn to accept the effects of the trauma that echo through her daily life as PTSD.

Through reading this book, it shows just how our mind dissociates while being abused.
Dissociation is something I have experienced as you know from my blog posts. But to experience what Alexis Rose had all through her life, I could not imagine. This book certainly lives up to the title of resilience and it gives hope to other victims who have suffered trauma and abuse, that you can get through it too. This book helped me to understand more about PTSD and the way my own PTSD had effected me, when I was struggling with mine at the beginning of my counselling sessions, when it was raw to start off with and during, that I revealed to my counsellor.

When I got to page 204, I shed tears of relief as Alexis Rose found the missing link with her counsellor.

I have been following Alexis Rose’s blog, ‘Untangled’ for some time now, which you can find here at: https://atribeuntangled.com/blog/

Alexis also did an interview you may like to read at, Vilina Christoph.

Book review: ‘Madness in the Mainstream,’ by Mark Drolsbaugh

When I used to write at ‘Liz’s deaf blog,’ I written a book review of Mark Drolsbaugh, ‘Madness in the mainstream.’ Although it did give it some air play, I felt I had not gave it enough as I would have liked, with me deciding on ending that blog. The original blog post from my deaf blog is long gone. (There is no cache available.) So I am writing up a post best I can, here.

‘Madness in the Mainstream,’ by Mark Drolsbaugh is rare accounts of what goes on behind the scenes when deaf and hard of hearing students are placed in mainstream educational settings, in accordance to Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). (This link will tell you more about the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.)

Mark Drolsbaugh uses his sense of humour and tell-it-like-it-is-approach, with input from his deaf son, as well as Mark Drolsbaugh’s own experience.

Dig into this book and you will discover:

  • The biggest myths in deaf education
  • What deaf and hard of hearing students aren’t telling their teachers
  • The long-term effects of mainstreaming and how to address them
  • The impact on students with cochlear implants
  • Survival skills of the deaf and hard of hearing
  • Social bluffing vs. self-advocacy
  • Eye-opening, real life stories

Although my deafness came on in adult life, there were some things I could relate to in this book, just like a previous book I once read; ‘On the fence: The Hidden World of the Hard of Hearing.’ (This book though, I had more in common with.)

The video below is of Mark Drolsbaugh talking about his ‘Madness in the Mainstream,’ book.

Both of the books I recommend reading.

For further information about Mark Drolsbaugh books, visit Handwave Publications.

 

© Elizabeth Fisher and My Wellbeing and Learning Journey.

Unauthorised use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to My Wellbeing and Learning Journey with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. But Guest Posts that feature on my blog are not allowed at all to be duplicated.