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Antidepressants – back to one a day

It was my review with the doctor today for my antidepressants and I am now back to one a day when it comes to taking them, after chatting with him. (Instead of one every other day.)
He is happy for me to be on them for some time if needed, with the strength being a low one and has not said about me coming back in so many months this time, so I imagine it will crop up in a much later appointment, or when I am just due for the check later when it becomes zero on my repeat prescription.

I let him know what I was doing and the situation still at work, along with how I feel about that. So it was after that conversation that he decided I should go back to one day. Unlike my work department, I trust my doctor and so I am happy with what he suggests.

While I was at my doctors, I also asked if my hay fever tablets could be changed to a non-drowsy one, because of me learning to drive and hopefully a car driver one day. I mentioned how the instructor brought this up regarding medication in general and checking that they don’t affect your driving. The doctor was happy to do this, but pointed out that even non-drowsy medication can make you drowsy. If I felt they were not good for me, I could go back and be given something else.

 

© Elizabeth Fisher and My Wellbeing and Learning Journey.

Unauthorised use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to My Wellbeing and Learning Journey with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. (But Guest Posts that feature on my blog are not allowed at all to be duplicated, as that is their copyright.)

Medication review

Today, I seen my doctor for my medication review. This appointment was to see how I have got on since I last seen him and to possibly reduce my antidepressants. Since last time seeing him, I told him I have been mainly well, with exception of recently when I had a week or two where I was feeling low and quiet with myself. I explained to my doctor that it did not help that my rash spread from my hands up and up to my arms, as I was self-conscious about it, as well as it being very irritating. I also said to him that I had it on my neck too and suspected the rash on my arms and necks was a sweat/heat rash, because it got worse when I was feeling hot. Other than that period of time, I have been feeling fine since.
My doctor was happy that I could start reducing my medication, if I was happy to. Which I am. So from today, I start taking my antidepressant every other day for the next two months and see how I go with that. I then see my doctor again in two months time, to discuss how I have been during that time and the possibility of reducing a little bit more. If this happens, then something like taking my medication every three days, but this will be discussed more, when I see him then.

As for my rash, if it came back, I am to use my Cetraben cream.

While I was there, I also had my flu jab. I told him how I chose to not have it last year and that I think I chose to not have it the year before either and so I thought I lost out from being able to have it. He told me I would not lose out, from not having the flu jab in the past and that I am entitled to it, as well as recommending that I should have it, with having asthma.

 

© Elizabeth Fisher and My Wellbeing and Learning Journey.

Unauthorised use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to My Wellbeing and Learning Journey with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. (But Guest Posts that feature on my blog are not allowed at all to be duplicated, as that is their copyright.)

Talking therapies

As you know from reading this blog, I have had counselling in the past, the last two sets of sessions being very helpful for me.
This was because after the counsellor who I had for my first of theses two sessions, identifying my childhood past being the cause of how I was now.
Since these sessions have ended, I have been writing this blog as my continuing therapeutic way of dealing with things, as well as other things, like learning something new, remembering to give self-love.

I recommend talking therapy to anyone who is struggling. Talking therapy can work alone, or alongside antidepressants from your doctor, depending on the individual.

I recently learnt that someone closer to me was not doing well as I thought. After this person asked for advice, which I gave, I could see there was a bit more to it then the person was letting on, so I asked further. The person wouldn’t answer this question, as was concerned how I would feel ashamed of them, of their response.
I reassured that person, that I am sure you have done nothing to be ashamed of and that the advice I gave before would not help alone, as I could see whatever this issue was needed to be addressed. This would mean if they felt they could not be open with me, then to speak to a counsellor where you will not need to feel worried about being judged, because they are there to listen.
On answering further questions about what to expect in counselling sessions to reassure this person, because they have never seen a counsellor before, I printed off the necessary information, so they could self-refer. I hope this person does follow it through, because I know this person would benefit from it so much.

If you are feeling the need to talk to someone and have no one, or not confident in speaking to a friend, or family member, then please do speak to a counsellor. They are not there to judge, they are there to help.

I do recommend talking therapy, because you are in a neutral place where you do not need to worry about upsetting, or worrying a friend or relative, so you can unburden yourself. A place where you also won’t feel judged.

For more information on talking therapies, please visit this page at Mental Health Foundation.

 

© Elizabeth Fisher and My Wellbeing and Learning Journey.

Unauthorised use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to My Wellbeing and Learning Journey with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. (But Guest Posts that feature on my blog are not allowed at all to be duplicated, as that is their copyright.)

Antidepressants

Past antidepressant I have been on has been Citalopram and now Sertraline.
Citalopram, worked quickly for me. I remember though that I was particularly feeling tired for the first few days, but it did wear off before the end of the week. The only time I would actually feel tired after that, would be within 45 minutes to an hour of taking it, prior to going to bed at night. I was on this for a year, which included the time coming off them gradually under doctors advice.

When I talked being on antidepressants again, the one I now take is Sertraline. Sertraline I found that it took several weeks before it seemed to take effect on me, which my doctor did warn me about, but however it did still concern me. When the tablet worked for me, it was difficult to describe how I knew it worked, because I was comparing how I was with the other antidepressant I once knew. Which was wrong for me to do, but I could not help it. Not feeling tired was one symptom I did not have. It did take me a while to realise that this tablet was helping, in its own way and to realise I was starting to feel myself again. Without my counselling alongside taking my antidepressants though, I would not have made a complete recovery.

When you are on antidepressants, you will probably hear a lot of negativity about them from those who are supposed to be your friend, or some family members. The first time I was on them, I unfortunately did and it does not help when you are battling with what they are opposing, to what your own doctor is talking about to you. Please do remember what your own doctor tells you and if you are not sure about anything, then please do ask your doctor questions, as he/she will only be happy to help.
Luckily, what I experienced first time round, I did not experience this time round. Instead I only received positive support.

For further reading, don’t forget this post I shared from another blog, where Megan clears up some misconceptions about antidepressants.

You can also read further about antidepressants via NHS Choices.

 

© Elizabeth Fisher and My Wellbeing and Learning Journey.

Unauthorised use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to My Wellbeing and Learning Journey with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. (But Guest Posts that feature on my blog are not allowed at all to be duplicated, as that is their copyright.)

Misconceptions About Antidepressants 

A post I thought I’d share from blogger, Megan. Megan clears up some misconceptions about antidepressants, which I think is a great post to read. Some of the things I use to hear myself when I first was on them.

Sail Through My Thoughts


I was scared to take antidepressants because of all of the negative things I have heard. Antidepressants won’t work for everyone, but you shouldn’t be scared to try them. Recovery is a trial and error process, and all options should be considered. Here is a list of common misconceptions about antidepressants:

1. Antidepressants cause a false sense of happiness: This is not accurate. Antidepressants cause serotonin levels to rise. Serotonin is the chemical responsible for happiness, but it does not directly cause happiness. Antidepressants make it possible to feel happy, but they won’t cause you to feel happy for no reason.

2. Antidepressants cause you to act robotic: This isn’t true in every case. In fact, pretending not to have emotions is a common defense mechanism, and that might be coming into play. Also, the recovery from depression is not a straight uphill slope. Recovery will fluctuate and that will…

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