My very personal posts of 2016, that started off this blog.

If it wasn’t for offloading and using this blog as part of my therapy to accept what happened to me, then I probably would not have started this blog. Writing this blog has helped me to move forward and some things that were really troubling me, to let go of the guilt that I should not have had to start with.
Most of these following posts all have a trigger warning of some kind, stated at the beginning of the post.

 

© Elizabeth Fisher and My Wellbeing and Learning Journey.

Unauthorised use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to My Wellbeing and Learning Journey with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. (But Guest Posts that feature on my blog are not allowed at all to be duplicated, as that is their copyright.)

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Talking therapies

As you know from reading this blog, I have had counselling in the past, the last two sets of sessions being very helpful for me.
This was because after the counsellor who I had for my first of theses two sessions, identifying my childhood past being the cause of how I was now.
Since these sessions have ended, I have been writing this blog as my continuing therapeutic way of dealing with things, as well as other things, like learning something new, remembering to give self-love.

I recommend talking therapy to anyone who is struggling. Talking therapy can work alone, or alongside antidepressants from your doctor, depending on the individual.

I recently learnt that someone closer to me was not doing well as I thought. After this person asked for advice, which I gave, I could see there was a bit more to it then the person was letting on, so I asked further. The person wouldn’t answer this question, as was concerned how I would feel ashamed of them, of their response.
I reassured that person, that I am sure you have done nothing to be ashamed of and that the advice I gave before would not help alone, as I could see whatever this issue was needed to be addressed. This would mean if they felt they could not be open with me, then to speak to a counsellor where you will not need to feel worried about being judged, because they are there to listen.
On answering further questions about what to expect in counselling sessions to reassure this person, because they have never seen a counsellor before, I printed off the necessary information, so they could self-refer. I hope this person does follow it through, because I know this person would benefit from it so much.

If you are feeling the need to talk to someone and have no one, or not confident in speaking to a friend, or family member, then please do speak to a counsellor. They are not there to judge, they are there to help.

I do recommend talking therapy, because you are in a neutral place where you do not need to worry about upsetting, or worrying a friend or relative, so you can unburden yourself. A place where you also won’t feel judged.

For more information on talking therapies, please visit this page at Mental Health Foundation.

 

© Elizabeth Fisher and My Wellbeing and Learning Journey.

Unauthorised use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to My Wellbeing and Learning Journey with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. (But Guest Posts that feature on my blog are not allowed at all to be duplicated, as that is their copyright.)

The Run.Rabbit.Run. PTSD award

I have been nominated “The Run.Rabbit.Run. PTSD Award,” by Courage Coaching. This has been a lovely surprise to receive with this blog not even a year old yet. Thank you Courage Coaching. (This award was previously known as the Blogger Recognition Award).

run-rabbit-award

The rules:

  • Thank the blog who nominated you, share the link and award on your blog.
  • Write a brief story on how you started blogging and any advice you would give to a new blogger.
  • Select nominees (max 15)
  • Advise nominees.

 

Why I started blogging

I started blogging as a releasing outlet for what I was feeling, which has now turned out to help others, or be an inspiration. My blog has reflected as I change accordingly, which I hope to keep my blog positive, but like anyone with depression, it could change on my down days etc…

Blogging became therapeutic for me and continues to do so and I have come across many lovely followers here since bringing my blog to WordPress.

Advice to any new bloggers

Advice I would give to a new blogger is to just be you, as this will reflect in your post.

I would like to nominate the following for The Run.Rabbit.Run. PTSD Award

These are just some of many, I have picked, that I love to follow for different reasons. I know some already have this award, so I don’t expect them to do it again and others that I have nominated I don’t know if they have. But enjoy the award either way.

I needed to face it

Yesterday via Facebook, I seen the following words that Tiny Buddha shared.

“Whatever pain from your past you’ve tried to outrun, you can’t avoid it forever. It will follow you until you face it and work through it.” ~Celina Murillo

(See more in this link at Tiny Buddha, for the above.)

This is so true. The minute I left school, I always said I’d never look back and I didn’t. I wanted to forget the bullies at school, as well as things from home.

I have had quite a few different counselling sessions for different reasons in my adult life. But it was from the counselling sessions before last Christmas where things really got uncovered. Things that were affecting me now, from my childhood. Some things blocked, until the stone was turned and I realised that how I was in some way now, was my past affecting me.

During and since my counselling has finished, I have seen and felt how calm I am now. How I don’t let things bother me as I did before. This has been my best I have ever been.

Although my counselling has finished, there are things I still have to do. But these, I can only do myself, using the tools my counsellor gave me.

Small steps, but I am still moving forward.

 

© Elizabeth Fisher and My Wellbeing and Learning Journey.

Unauthorised use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to My Wellbeing and Learning Journey with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. But Guest Posts that feature on my blog are not allowed at all to be duplicated.

My counselling sessions – Part 1 of 2

(Content Warning: mental health, childhood trauma I witnessed of cruelty to my dog, emotional abuse.)

Last year, I had six sessions of counselling. I referred myself to this, because I was feeling really low through stressful situations at work.
These work situations I was trying to deal with head on, only to find I was getting nowhere. My stress and frustrations increased and my confidence in the end, disappeared. Whenever I was at work, I just did not feel myself. I also dreaded going in, having panic attacks prior, or while I was there.

Outside of work, I was losing motivation, feeling depressed and I had trouble sleeping, so I knew I had to refer myself for some counselling.
By the time I started counselling, I was already on antidepressants for my depression and anxiety. My doctor monitored me closely to start with, because the antidepressants I was on would take some weeks to work its way around my system.

In my counselling sessions I started to talk about work and how the situations there were making me feel. I also spoke about what was going on with my Mum, as I was getting concerned with her mental health, which then led to how my Mum was in my childhood. (She is a good Mum I’d like to add and still is. It was her mental health, how it was then.)
I then started talking about my Dad, what he was like when I was a child and how I was fearful of him. The way he treated me and my dog at times was very wrong. Wrong when I look back now, but very scary and traumatic as a kid. My counsellor gave me coping skills to try for flashbacks I was getting.

The rest of my counselling session was mainly about my Dad, but because I was only just scratching the surface and my counselling was coming to an end, my counsellor recommended I seek further counselling. Seeking further counselling meant that it could be approached slowly, as this needed to be tackled carefully without rushing. She felt that my past situations were now affecting my present, so if I felt comfortable for extra counselling, then to visit my doctors again. Which I did. My doctor gave me details of two counsellors I could refer myself to. This counselling session started this year. But I will talk about it in another post, so look out for part 2.

Related post:

My counselling sessions – Part 2 of 2

 

© Elizabeth Fisher and My Wellbeing and Learning Journey.

Unauthorised use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to My Wellbeing and Learning Journey with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. But Guest Posts that feature on my blog are not allowed at all to be duplicated.