If you are frustrated with a deaf person…

If you are frustrated with a deaf person, because they can’t understand you through your face mask, then imagine how we feel when we are not given the access to hear. 

Remember. Remove your face mask, or wear a clear one!


© Elizabeth Fisher and My Wellbeing and Learning Journey.

Unauthorised use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to My Wellbeing and Learning Journey with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. (But Guest Posts that feature on my blog are not allowed at all to be duplicated, as that is their copyright.)

Making my feelings known as a deaf person

There are all sorts of badges out there for deaf and hard of hearing people and I have worn a few different versions.

I feel now it’s time for a new badge and I have made my choice by ordering this one today, from a UK Etsy seller: https://www.etsy.com/uk/listing/648174911/if-i-cant-see-your-lips-i-cant-hear-you.

There are others that appeal to me from other sellers, like one badge saying, “I can’t lip-read through your mask.” But the one above, that I have ordered, will cover all scenarios and I am looking forward to wearing it.

Post share: “Deaf 11-year-old and his MP ask Boris Johnson for see-through face masks”

Good on this 11 year old boy.

https://www.charitytoday.co.uk/deaf-11-year-old-and-his-mp-ask-boris-johnson-for-see-through-face-masks/

But us deaf/Deaf and hard of hearing people should not have to do this. The Government should have had this in place already.

If masks have to be used, then public services should only be using clear masks. Otherwise clear visors.

 

A break through for us with hearing loss/deaf/Deaf

A break through for us that are deaf/Deaf/hearing loss, who rely on lipreading and visual facial expressions to communicate when travelling. But as they have said, the Government need to now raise this so everyone knows the difficulties we face.

See further here: https://actiononhearingloss.org.uk/about-us/media-centre/latest-press-releases/charity-celebrates-win-on-government-guidance-for-mandatory-face-coverings-on-public-transport-for-those-who-lip-read/?utm_campaign=1444795_Hear%20at%20Home%2013%20Support%2FService%20Update%20E-News&utm_medium=email&utm_source=Action%20on%20Hearing%20Loss%20formerly%20known%20as%20the%20Royal%20National%20Institute%20for%20Deaf%20People&utm_Link_Name=CTA%20button%20-%20lead%20story&dm_i=45UF,UYT7,3F5386,3SCDD,1

Not in a hurry…

I plucked up the courage not long ago and decided to shop in a supermarket that is cheaper for a majority of things and where I usually go quite a lot, with my anxiety levels improving.
I went in mainly for my fruit and vegetables.

I avoided this place for many reasons and as I expected, I was right.  A majority of the shoppers in there did not respect their 2 meter distance, while shopping! Only when I was at the till, was 2 meter followed by the general public.

I prepped some of the vegetables I bought, for the freezer.

Will I go in there again, knowing I was right on my suspicions?

I don’t want to, but budget-wise I am going to have to, if I would like to stick to my budget from this month. But if I can avoid, I will. I’m not in a hurry, even with my face covered, I will not go in and I will avoid, if I can.
I let the council know about this, so it was forwarded to the appropriate department.
I think the store needs to start putting on security at their door, given our current situation.
From reading about this store, it’s happening in other areas too, as well as at another retailer I have not and will not shop in, while it’s like this.
The council got back to me on Monday, to let me know they were dealing with my complaint and to inform me what they will be doing, which was to pay a visit and take a look then adivise where needed. Apparently they have had previous discussions with them.

I still don’t go in another supermarket since all the changes came in due to Coronavirus. This is because I know they have arrows on their floor for particular direction they want you to walk down, in their aisles. This for me visually and mentally is too much to contend with; observing the 2 meter distance, observing where others are that follow, or don’t, the anxiety I can still get at times, which is worse when others are not observing their distance, to predict their next move. And especially when I am only picking up a few bits, as I have not used it as my main shop for years. So as long as it remains like that, when another supermarket doesn’t do that and while I feel as I do, I will avoid the place.
There is no need for that. Two meter markings is enough, just like the other store does. You don’t need arrows on top. Although I wouldn’t be surprised if it’s ignored by some. Maybe one day, I will feel I can mentally do this and go in. But I don’t see it happening anytime soon. I’m in no hurry.
As I have a loyalty card with them, they will see I don’t shop there at the moment. I was in there often before, including their cafe where I’d go in just before work, for a cuppa. When things lift even further one day, I won’t be in any hurry to go there for shopping, or for the cafe, when they can open.
I still haven’t walked through my town centre, since lockdown came in. That’s why I have ordered some things from Holland and Barrett, as well as Boots that I needed, or wanted, as they are in the town centre. I have no intentions walking in the town centre anytime soon.
I have not walked through the park, or nature reserve either, since all this and its not something I plan doing anytime soon. I’m in no hurry.

As much as I would like to support restaurants and cafes I went in before Coronavirus. I am in no hurry to return. The only chance I may go to a cafe and only, would be just for a drink, but only if I am sitting outside with it.


© Elizabeth Fisher and My Wellbeing and Learning Journey.

Unauthorised use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to My Wellbeing and Learning Journey with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. (But Guest Posts that feature on my blog are not allowed at all to be duplicated, as that is their copyright.)

What I use to help me as a deaf person

6th to the 12th May 2019 is Deaf Awareness Week.

Today’s post is about the equipment I use to help me as a deaf person:

My Phonak SP hearing aids

Hearing aids will never give back my normal hearing, but they do assist. I would be worser off without my hearing aids, than hearing with them.
I still rely on lipreading, even though I am wearing them. So I do need to see your face clearly. No covering of your mouth as you talk, otherwise I will have to politely request you to move your hand away and for you to repeat what you just said. I shared a link here, about Communication Tips.

Flashing doorbell

My flashing doorbell is loud, but I have it set so it flashes too. (Pictured above.) It is portable, so when I used to live in a house, I would take it to every room in the house. Including my bedroom.
Now I live in a flat, it stays in one room, which is the living room mainly. But if I was in the kitchen for a while and the washer is on, then I would take it with me, to be sure I won’t miss anyone at the door. But I don’t take it to the bedroom now, as so my sleep is not disturbed.

Vibrating clock

My bedside clock (as pictured above) can be set with a loud ring, vibration, or a combination of the two. I just set mine on vibrating as so I don’t disturb neighbours with the decibels of this clock.
The vibrating bad goes under my pillow and you definitely won’t sleep in with this one. The vibrating clock I have is a Sonic Bomb, by Sonic Alert alarm clock.

If it’s not changed in my area, you could get a bedside vibrating clock from Social Services. But I am happy to continue buying my own clock.

Fire alert (pictured above)

I have to admit that since moving in my flat, I do not have this set up and I don’t plan to now, until in my new flat. I know this puts me at a huge risk, because I do not hear fire alarms, with, or without hearing aids. This is a risk I am taking, I know.
My fire alert is a Silent Alert SignWave Portable Receiver, which came with my smoke alarms. It’s a wireless signal and in the day my alerter is easily portable.
Should there ever be a fire in the day it would make a noise, as well as flash and the fire icon would flash to show it is a fire for the reason it is going off.
At night, it goes on a charger and I have a vibrating pad connected to this which would go under my mattress.
If it was to go off at night, it would flash and ring out as in the day, but also the pad would vibrate too. The vibrating pad is strong. Even under the mattress.

This same alerter can be connected to other things, but being an old unit, you can’t seem to get other things available widely.
One time, years ago when I had a landline phone, I had an attachment that was connected to my phone line and if the phone rang, my unit would alert me, by flashing and making a noise. Before even looking at the unit to see the phone display flashing, you would know, because the alert would be a different tone, of an old fashioned phone ringing.
I had this unit arranged by the Social Services, who contacted the department in the fire services to provide fire alarms and alerter. Social Services provided the device for my phone line and one time a door push, so it was a doorbell too. But the doorpush wasn’t great and so this is why I have my own set up.

Vibrating travel clock

When on holiday, I take my Sonic Alert vibrating travel clock with me, as pictured above. It can be set to alert, or vibrate, or combination of both. I don’t hear the ring, so I only use the vibrating option. The display folds down flat and it goes inside my pillowcase.
This is a very good vibrating clock, so there is no lying in with this one.
There is a light on this clock, if you require to see the time in the dark, but I always have my mobile phone near for that part.

As well as these, I use email like anyone else, the difference for me is, that this is my preferred communication over a phone, as I cannot understand well over the phone for a conversation. Not even my mum.

I also like to text and is equally my preferred communication, as email is.

When text, or email is not available to me, then face-to-face is another way to communicate with me. With the hearing I have left and the hearing aids I wear, I also lipread and I do use fingerspelling letters of the alphabet.
I did a post on Communication Tips earlier this week, that gives tips to help people like me, hear you. These tips work very well with me, so do refer back to that, so you can help keep someone like me involved in conversations.

That’s my last post as part of Deaf Awareness Week and this year. As it is the first time I have gave you more insight into my life and as part of Deaf Awareness Week, I hope you have learnt more about me and the topics in general, that I shared this week.

 

© Elizabeth Fisher and My Wellbeing and Learning Journey.

Unauthorised use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to My Wellbeing and Learning Journey with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. But Guest Posts that feature on my blog are not allowed at all to be duplicated.

 

British Sign Language

6th to the 12th May 2019 is Deaf Awareness Week.

Yesterday, I talked about Communication Tips. Today, it’s about British Sign Language. I am no expert at this, so I share a link below that will take you to a page on Action on Hearing Loss and where you can learn more about it there.

Learn more about British Sign Language, at Action on Hearing Loss.

What I can share though is misconception that people assume I use sign language because I am deaf. I don’t. I have tried to learn it, but because there was no one to practice with, meant I could not keep it up and remember. Even some small parts I remembered well are now slipping, because it’s not used.

What I do remember though, is fingerspelling the alphabet. I learnt this before I became deaf. No one uses it around me though, including my mum. But if they did, by fingerspelling the first letter of that word I am struggling with, while repeating the word, it would help me.

 

© Elizabeth Fisher and My Wellbeing and Learning Journey.

Unauthorised use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to My Wellbeing and Learning Journey with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. But Guest Posts that feature on my blog are not allowed at all to be duplicated.