Book review: “Molly and the Cat Cafe,” by Melissa Daley.

“Molly and the Cat Cafe,” is written by Melissa Daley.

Molly and the cat cafe
It is a fictional story about one homeless cat, who embarks on a journey to find a new home. Molly ends up at Stourton-on-the-Hill and is welcomed by a caring cafe owner, Debbie.
Debbie, like Molly is an outsider and is struggling with her cafe and a local is on the warpath to keep her out newcomers.
Debbie also has a daughter, so she is desperate to turn the struggling cafe around.

I thoroughly enjoyed this book, which I read in two days. I just could not put this down.
I also liked how it was written from the cat; Molly’s perspective.

A beautiful story, of Molly’s journey.

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Book review: “How to make your cat an internet celebrity,” by Patricia Carlin

This book, “How to make your cat an internet celebrity,” is written by Patricia Carlin, with photography by Dustin Fenstermacher is a book I have read more than once because of the humourous content. A gift I received some time back from a friend one Christmas, or birthday.

Cats can become superstars on the internet and this book can unlock secrets to growing your cat for stardom.

Contents:

  • Introduction – Embracing your destiny
  • Chapter 1 – Growing your star
  • Chapter 2: Lights, kitty, action!
  • Chapter 3: Clawing your way to the top
  • Chapter 4: The world is your litter box
  • Acknowledgement

As you can see from some of the titles of the content, it’s enough to make you smile. The book has photographs of cats throughout the book, to make you smile, or laugh while reading the content.

Book review: “The Little Book of Mindfulness,” by Dr Patrizia Collard.

“The Little Book of Mindfulness,” by Dr Patrizia Collard is a “little” book, measuring only 15cm by 11cm. It has 96 pages of what hopes to be inspiration for the reader, of simple 5 to 10 minute practices of mindfulness.
I have read all the book for inspiration and although I have not practised any yet, there are many I am familiar with and if you have, or do Yoga, or Pilates yourself, then you will be familiar with some of the suggestions in this book too. But it is still perfect reminder.
What about the ones that I have given me new inspiration?
One example was ‘mindful eating,’ examining the food you are about to eat, looking at it like you have never seen it before, like a raisin for example. Holding it in the palm of your hand and noticing the difference in size, colour, form, weight and shape. Observing the ridges and the texture of the surface, so your vision can really have a feast on this. There are other suggestions while holding this fruit, before it leads onto smelling it, then tasting it and observing at that point as you chew the flavours, the change of consistency of the raisin and what you may notice completely new to you.

The contents of this book:

  • Introduction
  • Being in the now
  • Accept and respond
  • Making your mind up
  • Simply be
  • Mindful eating
  • Gratitude and compassion
  • Everyday mindfulness
  • Acknowledgments

 

Related post: 

Doodle and Mindfulness 

You may also like reading this post:

How do you Meditate,” over at https://lizalizaskysaregrey.com

Book review: “Positive Outcomes for Dissociative Survivors – Emotional Resource Guide,” by Carolyn Spring.

This book brings a number of articles and concepts that are designed to help people learn how to take back control over their traumatised emotional and bodily states. This is through understanding concepts such as the back brain and the front brain, the window of tolerance and the trauma traffic light.

Contents of this book:

  • Introduction
  • Coping with crisis
  • Emergency box
  • Managing triggers
  • Body sensations
  • Managing flashbacks
  • The trauma traffic light
  • The window of tolerance
  • Emergency cards
  • Alphabet of emotions
  • Safety kit: Emotional thermometer
  • Mental Health Act 1983

This 57 page guide-book, I bought from Amazon and it is for those who experience frequent states of debilitating, even life-threatening distress and is also a resource for those who work with this client group.

The book advises on its contents page to take care when reading, as some content may be triggering.

I like how this book explained the ‘back brain’ and the ‘front brain’ and, how and why we respond the way we do. Even more so, due to our past trauma we may have experienced.
I also was reminded by reading this book, that how I react to my triggers is not my fault and to not give myself self-hate because of it, as this does help either.

When being triggered, it gives tips on how I could get my front brain to switch back online, after a trigger.

About the author

Carolyn Spring is an author as well as being Director of PODS (Positive Outcomes for Dissociative Survivors) and its charity framework START (Survivors Trauma and Abuse Recovery Trust). PODS works to make recovery from dissociative disorders a reality through training, informing and supporting.
Carolyn Spring is also Editor of ‘Multiple Parts,’ a magazine/journal produced three times a year for PODS and also spends a large proportion of her time training at PODS’ many events throughout the UK.
She developed Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID) as a result of prolonged and extreme childhood abuse, but believes passionately in recovery and the dignity and respect that is due to all human beings, but especially those who have been abused as children.

Book review: “I could pee on this,” by Francesco Marciuliano.

This book is written by the same author, as the book I shared yesterday. This book made me laugh just like the other one did and again, this book would suit cat lovers. I received this book with the one I shared in yesterday’s post, for Christmas.

This book is poems by cats. 🙂 😉

Contents of this book:

  • Introduction
  • Chapter 1: Family
  • Chapter 2: Work
  • Chapter 3: Play
  • Chapter 4: Existence
  • Acknowledgements

Through this book, it will reveal every cats desires, conflict and their epiphany. Also why cats do the things they do.

 

Book review: “You need more sleep – Advice from cats,” by Francesco Marciuliano.

A compact book that I received as a gift at Christmas, along with another book of the same author, which I will be blogged soon.

This book offers feline advice to us humans, their life-improving tips such as:

  • Always stay at least 30 feet from a loved one
  • Enter a room like you own it and everyone inside it
  • Never doubt yourself until it’s too late
  • Don’t be nice to unpleasant people
  • Indecisions shows that you’re thinking!

These and other invaluable skills will have you living the cat life in no time!

Contents:

  • Introduction: listen to the cats
  • Chapter 1: personal relationships
  • Chapter 2: Social interaction
  • Chapter 3: Career advancement
  • Chapter 4: You, you, you!
  • Acknowledgments

The book is purrfect, (sorry perfect) sized book for your handbag to take on your travels. A book that cat lovers will enjoy. Small, easy-to-digest tips, with gorgeous photos of cats throughout. Although, if you were to follow some of the cats tips, then you could get into trouble for some of them. (From a human perspective and not if a cat had done it.) Like  for example, turn up to work naked. 😉

This book was a chuckle to read all throughout and I have another book written by the same author called, “If I could pee on this – and other poems by cats.” I will share that book review tomorrow.

Related post

 

Book review: “Untangled: A story of resilience, courage and triumph,” by Alexis Rose.

“Untangled: …” by Alexis Rose is her own true life story, recalling her life of unimaginable abuse and explicit threats. Alexis Rose repressed these memories of her past, until a family tragedy forced her to face what her life had been.

This book gives a note to the readers before the story starts, to warn how it could be triggering because of descriptions of sexual and physical abuse.

A history of abuse, torture and threats to maintain her silence or be killed, could no longer be denied.
This book is her story of facing the truth and risking the consequences of breaking the silence, to start a healing journey and to learn to live her life. Alexis Rose had to also learn to accept the effects of the trauma that echo through her daily life as PTSD.

Through reading this book, it shows just how our mind dissociates while being abused.
Dissociation is something I have experienced as you know from my blog posts. But to experience what Alexis Rose had all through her life, I could not imagine. This book certainly lives up to the title of resilience and it gives hope to other victims who have suffered trauma and abuse, that you can get through it too. This book helped me to understand more about PTSD and the way my own PTSD had effected me, when I was struggling with mine at the beginning of my counselling sessions, when it was raw to start off with and during, that I revealed to my counsellor.

When I got to page 204, I shed tears of relief as Alexis Rose found the missing link with her counsellor.

I have been following Alexis Rose’s blog, ‘Untangled’ for some time now, which you can find here at: https://atribeuntangled.com/blog/

Alexis also did an interview you may like to read at, Vilina Christoph.