My go-to, in times of escape.

It got difficult because of feeling that mentally and physically drained for so long this year, that when I found the new morning job wasn’t for me and the circumstances around it, that I have revealed in earlier posts, that it pushed me to my limit energy-wise.

I have cried and still have my moments, while I feel like this. I have regardless how I have been, still been able to crack jokes and have a laugh. But behind it all, it has still been pained. Hopefully, now I have finished my morning cleaning job, I should hopefully get my energy back and start to feel more better.

But while I have been as I have been, my go-to, in times of escape, have been the following:

  • Walking, especially in nature.
  • Watching Michael Flatley’s, Lord of the Dance DVD.
  • Listening to Michael Flatley’s Lord of the Dance.
  • Sleeping

My own vitality wheel and wellness journal.

Image of my Vitality Wheel

My vitality wheel in the photo above, hangs on my light pegs, above where I sit in the living room.
I started creating this vitality wheel after reading an article on what it was about, when researching the book I came across, “The self-care revolution,” by Suzy Reading. I blogged about this book here, in this post.
When I started reading the book, I referred and, changed my vitality wheel accordingly, as I learnt more and gave more thought to mine.

Below, is my journal I’m using as my wellness journal.

The words on the front of my journal say:

BE HAPPY BE
BRIGHT
BE YOU

I think these words are appropriate for what I am using this journal for.

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The pages inside this journal are in pastel pink and blue. Pages are lined to start with, then there are plain pages.

Each of the pages has one of the three following quotes at the bottom of each page:

  • You are something magical
  • Every cloud has a silver lining
  • Your sparkle hasn’t gone unnoticed

This journal I started creating, before knowing and reading the book, “The self-care revolution.”

The book suggested to create a journal, as well as the vitality wheel. But you were not forced to, if you felt it was too much writing a journal. I chose not to create a journal, but the book has influenced slightly my journal, as I take something from it, with what I was doing already.

This is two of my pages from my journal, in the photo below. This is the same layout I use for each day.

One of my two pages from my journal

As you can see it is a nice simple layout, but I do have space should I wish to track anything else.

So at the moment, as my layout shows, I track my:

  • Food
  • Activity
  • What I did for me
  • Mood

At the front of my journal, I have a yearly mood chart.
It’s the same layout I used before, but with a very slight change in list of moods to before, as I wanted to put some of the moods to their own list, rather than combined.

My yearly mood chart for 2019

And that’s my journal for now until full and then the plan will be to have a ring binder journal in future with this in, as well as my planner. That way, it will be all in place. So I will look at buying an A5 leather filofax, that will combine this and my personal planner together.

 

Book review: The self-care revolution, by Suzy Reading.

Through doing different Google searches related to self-care, after realising slowly I have been slipping up at times and so open to fresh ideas, I came across this book, “The self-care revolution,” by Suzy Reading.
I did further searches on this book, then looked at the reviews for the book and liked what I seen.
I even seen an article about the “vitality wheel,” through researching this book. The article was an interview with Suzy Reading for this book and she explained how the “vitality wheel” works. I knew even more this book felt like it was going to be useful for me, along with making my own “vitality wheel,” with it being a visual thing. (I will share my “vitality wheel” and anything else I take from this book, in a later post.)
I bought this book from The Works, as it was a few pounds cheaper there.

Book cover of the self-care revolution by Suzy Reading

This book is designed to help and restore your day-to-day energy reserves. Remember me mentioning the “vitality wheel” before?
In this book you will learn about creating your own “vitality wheel.” It’s a complete body and mind self-care toolkit.
The “vitality wheel” consists of eight parts, which the book separates into these eight parts individually as a chapter.

  • Sleep, rest relaxation and breathing
  • Movement and nutrition
  • Coping skills
  • Physical environment
  • Social connection
  • Mood boosters
  • Goal-setting and accomplishment
  • Values and purpose

The book can be started anywhere you like, so just pick the section you feel you need to focus on first and go from there. But I think when you first pick up this book, to read it through the first time, then go back to where you feel after.

As well as creating your own “vitality wheel,” it also suggests creating a journal. But you don’t have to, as the author of this book wants you to pick out what is right for you.

Over time, you may need to update your “vitality wheel,” because our needs change. So this book will always become a referencing tool to refer back to and remind you.

I have felt this book has replaced past books I found handy, because I find this visually more appealing and easy to read. I have learnt a lot more new things, from this book too.

The author tells a bit about herself at the beginning and how she came about creating this book. It then goes into the introduction of self-care, followed by the “vitality wheel.” After that, each chapter is for each part of the “vitality wheel.”
After the chapters associated with each part of the wheel, it goes on about your self-care toolkit, reminding you how it’s not selfish to practice self-care. Then a reminder of what to do next, in the following chapter, giving examples of what you could have as your self-care toolkit.

There are mantras and affirmations you can try, as well as a few yoga poses for each part of the “vitality wheel.” Again, the author reminds you to choose what you feel is right for you.

This book is certainly something I recommend and it’s a book to refer back to as your needs change in the future.

If you liked this post, then look out for a further post on Saturday when I share my vitality wheel that I have created for myself. I will also be sharing my wellness journal in that post too.

#WellnessWednesday – Some of my scents I find soothing and relaxing

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These are just some of my different scents in the photo above, that I find soothing, that helps me relax:

  • Yardley rose perfume
  • The Original Champneys Health Spa – Summer Dream Rewarding Body Lotion
  • Relaxing lavender and coconut oil hydrating spritz
  • Relaxing lavender temple balm

 

As well as the above, I also like my scented candles, or scented oil in my diffuser.

And I find the smell and taste of Earl Grey tea comforting too.

What scents do you like, that feel soothing and relaxing?

Blog post re-share: “43 Self-Care Practices for the Highly Sensitive Person,” Renee Shuman

A blog post I came across today and thought I would share: “43 self-care practices for the highly sensitive person,” you will find over at “Will Folic For Food.” Click on link below, to take you to the post. It’s a couple of years old this post, but I still feel it’s useful.

https://www.willfrolicforfood.com/blog/2017/04/43-self-care-practices-for-the-highly-sensitive-person.html?format=amp

Blog post re-share: Why Those of us That Can, Must Fight — The Bipolar Writer Mental Health Blog

I would like to share this post with my readers, from The Bipolar Writer Mental Health Blog.

I also agree with the first commenter in that blog post too, by Alanpenrose5654.

Do take a read of this blog post and the comments. Also, if you are not already following this blog, I totally recommend you do.

I hope that all of us in the mental illness blogging community have the same goals–to end the stigma surrounding mental illness. I believe that to keep the fight going and maybe educate those that have never walked a day in our shoes, it is imperative to share your story. We are all unique, and though we may share similar symptoms of our collective illnesses, it is how you deal and your past that might help future mental illness sufferers.

via Why Those of us That Can, Must Fight — The Bipolar Writer Mental Health Blog